Category Archives: Toxins

Why + How to Avoid Glyphosate


For a long time, Monsanto’s weedkiller glyphosate (the main component of Roundup) appeared to be nontoxic to humans. Consequently, farmers began using it liberally on their fields and crops, which rapidly increased residues in our food and water supply (especially on wheat). Unfortunately, a large and growing body of evidence suggests that glyphosate is causing a variety of serious chronic conditions, even at the “safe” levels we are all being exposed to.

Far from being an innocuous herbicide, glyphosate:

This isn’t one of those cases where negative effects are only seen at unrealistically high intakes. A review published in 2016 in Environmental Health points out that there is “…evidence of heightened cancer risk in human populations at levels of exposure actually experienced in human populations” and that kidney and liver damage occurs “in the range of what are now generally considered ‘safe’ for humans”.

Conventional wheat is especially noxious because it is routinely doused with glyphosate at least three times during cultivation, with a heavy dose right before harvest. This final dose dramatically increases glyphosate residues in foods made with wheat.

Due to this cumulative data, at least 13 countries have banned or severely limited the use of glyphosate. The US is not one of them. Not only that, but the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for glyphosate in the US is almost six times higher than in the EU (1.75 vs 0.3 mg/kg body weight/day).

To avoid glyphosate-related health issues, especially if you already suffer from hormone imbalance, kidney impairment, fatty liver, digestive woes including Celiac, or food sensitivities, it would be wise to:

  • When eating wheat, always be sure it’s organic.
  • Minimize or eliminate wheat in general.
  • Choose organic produce as much as possible.
  • Avoid using the weedkiller Roundup in your yard or garden. You can absorb it through your skin and lungs.
In our next post, we’ll share some great alternatives to wheat!
Image credit: Chafer Machinery

What’s your Smoking?

I have a friend who smokes. Not all the time, but maybe a little more than “just when she’s out drinking”. She is polite about it, and doesn’t expose us to her second hand smoke. The rest of my friends don’t smoke, and as a whole, are vigorously and vocally anti-smoking. So as you might suspect, my smoking friend periodically gets a little well-intentioned flack from my anti-smoking friends.

At one point, she asked why it’s okay for all of us to get on her case about her occasional smoking, when it would be politically incorrect, mean, and hurtful for her to get on anyone else’s case for their unhealthy daily habits, like eating too much sugar, eating too much in general, not exercising, drinking too much alcohol, not prioritizing sleep, etc? You know, the kind of stuff we all do a little too much, a little too often. Are these things not as dangerous as cigarette smoke?

Well, dang. She had a point.

Dr David Katz, founding director of the Yale-Griffith Prevention Research center, said, “Children today will experience more chronic degenerative disease as a result of their poor eating habits than from cigarettes, alcohol and drugs combined.” Although he was talking about kids, research suggests that this probably applies to adults too. Quitting smoking is certainly low hanging fruit for improving health. But so is quitting sugar, and the like.

This conversation reminded me of the biblical quote about removing the log from your own eye before trying to remove the speck from someone else’s. So my take home message was this – when I find myself getting judgmental about my friend smoking, instead of getting on her case, telling her what she already knows, I’m going to ask myself, What’s MY “smoking” and what am I going to do about that?

What are your thoughts about this topic? Comment below!

Update: The friend mentioned in this post quit!!!

Image credit: KsushPush

Water Bottle Alert!

Staying hydrated is so important, but we want to caution you about keeping packs of plastic water bottles in your car all summer. A recent study found 93% of all bottled water contains dissolved microplastics. The intense heat in the trunk of your car warms the plastic bottles, which causes even more plastic to dissolve into the water. These molecules have a wide array of unpleasant health effects, including disrupting your hormonal system. Do you and your family a huge favor, and fill up your Hydro Flasks or Life Factory bottles with nice cold water before you head out. It might not be as convenient, but health issues are even less convenient!

Image credit: Jane Olsson